Travel guide for Rhodes Island 16/12/2014


By far the largest and always the most powerful of the Dodecanese Islands, Rhodes (ro-dos) abounds in beaches, wooded valleys and ancient history. Whether you arrive in search of buzzing nightlife, languid sun worshipping, or diving in crystal-clear waters, or embark on a culture-vulture journey through past civilisations, it’s all here. The atmospheric Old Town of Rhodes is a maze of cobbled streets that will spirit you back to the days of the Byzantine Empire and beyond. Further south is the picture-perfect town of Lindos, a magical vision of sugar-cube houses spilling down to a turquoise bay.

With miles of beaches, a forested, mountainous interior, Crusader castles, frescoed churches, one of the finest medieval towns in the Mediterranean and eight sunny months a year, Rhodes can’t help but be a winner for holidaymakers. In a good year, nearly two million visitors pile in to stay, not counting short stopovers by numerous cruise patrons. The walled old town of Rhodes, a successive effort of the Knights Hospitaller of St John and the Ottomans, has justly been accorded Unesco World Heritage status, and rarely fails to impress with its sandstone architecture, flying buttresses over cobbled streets and a skyline exotically stooked with minarets and palm trees.

Transfers: Diagoras airport, with terminals old and new (most international flights arrive at the new one), is about 15km (nine miles) south-west of the main town on the west coast. Rhodes is a major ferry destination from all the other Dodecanese islands, Crete and several Cyclades, as well as Piraeus. Almost all craft – except cruise ships and catamarans/hydrofoils – dock at remote Akandiá,the easternmost of Rhodes Town’s three ports, well outside the medieval walls.

Rhodes is a big island so you will most certainly need a transportation vehicle to explore all of its beauties. Please check our Special Low Rates Car rental deals and book a car or a moto online. 

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